Nigerian Journal of Cardiology

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2015  |  Volume : 12  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 77--80

Zaria-made jugulometre: Assessing its usefulness in bedside medicine


Shidali Y Vincent1, George G Nathaniel1, Yakubu D Peter1, Danbauchi S Solomon2 
1 Department of Medicine, Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Shika-Zaria, Nigeria
2 Department of Medicine, Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos, Plateau, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Shidali Y Vincent
Department of Medicine, Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Shika-Zaria
Nigeria

Background: Despite the availability of more sophisticated and invasive procedures for central venous pressure measurement, the role of estimating the height (in cm of water) of the internal jugular vein at bedside cannot be overemphasized. A handy instrument for this purpose was compared with the age-long procedure of combining two rulers. Objective: To compare the conventional means of jugular venous pressure (JVP) estimation with the use of a new instrument (Jugulometre). Materials and Methods: Forty-one (41) patients with elevated JVP in heart failure were recruited consecutively from two centers in a prospective study. JVP was estimated by conventional method. This was repeated using the jugulometre with and without light source separately. The time taken and height of JVP were noted. Data analysis was done using SPSS statistical software (version 16). Results: A total of 41 patients consisting of 21 (51.2%) males and 20 (48.8%) females with a mean age of 39.41 ΁ 13.79 years were examined. Analysis was done comparing conventional method and instrument without light (pair 1), conventional method and instrument with light (pair 2), and instrument without light and instrument with light (pair 3). There was a significant positive correlation (r = 0.830,0.830, and 0.954, respectively) in the height of JVP (P < 0.000 each). Also the difference seen in the values of JVP height were not statistically significant (P > 0.174, 0.179 and 1.000). Time difference (in seconds) for measuring the JVP were found to be statistically significant (P < 0.004, 0.000 and 0.011) and shorter with the jugulometre. Conclusion: The Zaria-made jugulometre is faster, less cumbersome and has comparable accuracy to the conventional way of JVP estimation by the bedside. It is therefore recommended for routine patient examination.


How to cite this article:
Vincent SY, Nathaniel GG, Peter YD, Solomon DS. Zaria-made jugulometre: Assessing its usefulness in bedside medicine.Nig J Cardiol 2015;12:77-80


How to cite this URL:
Vincent SY, Nathaniel GG, Peter YD, Solomon DS. Zaria-made jugulometre: Assessing its usefulness in bedside medicine. Nig J Cardiol [serial online] 2015 [cited 2021 Sep 27 ];12:77-80
Available from: https://www.nigjcardiol.org/article.asp?issn=0189-7969;year=2015;volume=12;issue=2;spage=77;epage=80;aulast=Vincent;type=0