• Users Online: 253
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 14  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 92-96

Prevalence of dyspeptic symptoms among patients on low-dose antiplatelet therapy


1 Department of Internal Medicine, Gastroenterology/Hepatology Unit, University of Calabar, Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria
2 Department of Internal Medicine, Cardiology Unit, University of Uyo, Akwa Ibom, Nigeria
3 Department of Internal Medicine, Dermatology Unit, University of Calabar, Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria
4 Department of Internal Medicine, Cardiology Unit, University of Calabar, Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Uchenna C Okonkwo
Department of Internal Medicine, Gastroenterology/Hepatology Unit, University of Calabar, P.M.B. 1115, Calabar, Cross River State
Nigeria
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/njc.njc_15_17

Rights and Permissions

Background: Low-dose antiplatelet therapy is the standard of care for the prevention of primary and secondary cardiovascular events. Dyspeptic symptoms may result in discontinuation of treatment. Aim: The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of dyspeptic symptoms among patients on low-dose antiplatelet therapy for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events. Subjects, Materials, and Methods: This was a cross-sectional descriptive study of 253 adults on low-dose antiplatelet attending the Cardiology Clinic of the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital. Prevalence and clinical impact of dyspepsia were assessed using a structured questionnaire incorporating the gastrointestinal symptom rating scale. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 20. Results: A total of 253 patients were recruited for this study. The mean age was 54 ± 12.2 years. The prevalence of dyspeptic symptoms was 47.8%. Epigastric pain was the most common self-reported dyspeptic symptom (33.2%) followed by heartburn (23.7%). Melena and hematemesis were reported by 5.5% and 1.2% of the patients. Treatment duration was longer for those with dyspeptic symptoms (45.8 ± 139.6 vs. 28.3 ± 31 months), but the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.17). A prior history of peptic ulcer disease was predictive of dyspeptic symptoms (odds radio; 8.62, confidence interval; 2.49–29.83). Majority (71.7%) of the patients reported their symptoms as occasional episodes which mildly impair their daily quality of life. Compliance was impacted in 6.7% of the patients. Conclusion: Dyspeptic symptoms, mostly epigastric pain, are prevalent among Nigerian patients on low-dose antiplatelets which negatively impact their daily life activities and compliance to treatment.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1785    
    Printed89    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded137    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal