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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 98-102

Vitamin C alleviates surgical castration-induced dyslipidemia in male rats


1 Department of Physiology, College of Health Sciences, University of Ilorin, Ilorin, Nigeria
2 Department of Physiology, College of Health Sciences, University of Ilorin, Ilorin; Department of Standards and Quality Assurance, National Health Insurance Scheme, North Central A Zonal Office, Kwara State Ministry of Health Premises, Fate, Kwara, Nigeria
3 Department of Anatomy, College of Health Sciences, University of Ilorin, Ilorin, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Abdullateef I Alagbonsi
Department of Standards and Quality Assurance, National Health Insurance Scheme, North Central A Zonal Office, Kwara State Ministry of Health Premises, Fate, Ilorin, Kwara
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0189-7969.187706

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Background and Aims: Androgen deprivation has been shown to be associated with dyslipidemia. Ameliorative effect of Vitamin C on dyslipidemia has also been reported. This study aimed at investigating the role of Vitamin C supplementation in castration-induced dyslipidemia. Materials and Methods: Twenty male rats were randomly divided in a blinded fashion into 4 groups (n = 5 each): Groups I and II were sham-castrated and received normal saline (1 ml/kg) and 1.25 g/kg Vitamin C, respectively, whereas Groups III and IV were rendered bilaterally castrated and received normal saline (1 ml/kg) and 1.25 g/kg Vitamin C for 4 weeks. Results and Conclusions: Castrated rats had reduced high-density lipoprotein, testosterone, estradiol, but increased low density lipoprotein, triglycerides, total cholesterol, and Castelli index and had no effect on follicle stimulating hormone when compared to sham-operated rats. Vitamin C supplements improved these parameters in normal and castrated rats. This study showed that castration-associated dyslipidemia and atherogenic risk in male rats is dependent on testosterone and estradiol. In addition, Vitamin C improves these parameters in normal and castrated rats by increasing testosterone and estradiol production, possibly from extra-testicular sites. However, there is a need for further study to ascertain the actual extra-testicular testosterone and estradiol production site.


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