Nigerian Journal of Cardiology

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2019  |  Volume : 16  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 49--53

Normogram of right ventricular echocardiographic dimensions in a cohort of normal term neonates in Ibadan


Oluwakemi Ashubu, Adejumoke Idowu Ayede, Bosede Adebayo, Samuel I Omokhodion 
 Department of Paediatrics, College of Medicine, University College Hospital, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Samuel I Omokhodion
Department of Paediatrics, College of Medicine, University College Hospital, University of Ibadan, Ibadan
Nigeria

Abstract

Introduction: The study of the right ventricle is a relatively young field, particularly in the newborn. This study assessed the right ventricular echocardiographic dimensions in a cohort of normal term neonates in Ibadan. Materials and Methods: This was a longitudinal cohort study involving 120 term neonates with normal maternal cardio topographic (CTG) parameters, physical findings, and oxygen saturation. The right ventricular dimensions were measured at birth and then weekly till age 28 days. The measurements obtained in millimeters were as follows: the main pulmonary artery, right ventricular anterior wall thickness, right ventricular diameter in diastole, interventricular septum thickness in diastole, and interventricular septal thickness in systole. Echocardiographic assessment was done with the Sonosite Titan mobile ultrasound machine with 5.0MHz transducer; measurements were made according to the American Society of Echocardiography recommendations. Results: A total of 120 normal term newborns were studied, of which 60 males and 60 females. The mean weight varied from 3.16 to 4.02 kg, the length varied from 48.25 to 54.38 cm, whereas the body surface area varied from 0.036/m2 to 0.037/m2. The mean values and their respective standard deviations relative to the echocardiographic measurements are presented and right ventricular normograms derived from echo parameters and weight using 95% confidence interval. Conclusions: This study has focused on right ventricular echocardiographic dimensions in normal newborn using a longitudinal cohort of newborn evaluated using CTG and pulse oximetry monitoring, thus demonstrating true normal zero probability of recruiting asphyxiated babies. The parameters thus can be used for evaluating Nigerian newborns pending the availability of results from larger multicenter studies.



How to cite this article:
Ashubu O, Ayede AI, Adebayo B, Omokhodion SI. Normogram of right ventricular echocardiographic dimensions in a cohort of normal term neonates in Ibadan.Nig J Cardiol 2019;16:49-53


How to cite this URL:
Ashubu O, Ayede AI, Adebayo B, Omokhodion SI. Normogram of right ventricular echocardiographic dimensions in a cohort of normal term neonates in Ibadan. Nig J Cardiol [serial online] 2019 [cited 2019 Dec 10 ];16:49-53
Available from: http://www.nigjcardiol.org/text.asp?2019/16/1/49/269645


Full Text



 Introduction



The right ventricle (RV) in the newborn has been described over time as a complex entity to evaluate due to its complex structure; making the quantitative assessment of RV size and function being described as often difficult.[1] The RV not only serves as a conduit but it also has an essential contribution to normal cardiac pump function. In the past, the importance of RV function has been underestimated; however, there has been a change in thought concerning this in recent times. There is a paucity of echocardiographic data describing RV dimensions. The study of the RV is a relatively young field.[2] This study assessed the right ventricular echocardiographic dimensions in a cohort of normal term neonates in Ibadan.

 Materials and Methods



Study design

The study was a longitudinal cohort type involving 120 normal term neonates identified at birth and followed up for a total of 2 months.

Study site

The study was conducted in the University College Hospital (UCH), Ibadan and Adeoyo Maternity Teaching Hospital, Ibadan. These are the two biggest referral hospitals serving Ibadan, neighboring communities and states. The babies were recruited between March and December 2015.

Ethical approval

The ethical approval for the study was obtained from the University of Ibadan/UCH Institutional Review Board and the Ethical Review Committee of Oyo State Ministry of Health (AD13/479/530).

Recruitment of the study participants

Case record notes of women presenting in labor at term in the two hospitals were evaluated for eligibility. They were eligible for monitoring only if they did not have medical conditions that could predispose their babies to asphyxia. Eligible women were then monitored during the second stage of labor using cardio topographic (CTG) 7 fetal/maternal monitor. Newborns that were delivered by normal vaginal delivery were further assessed by carrying out the appearance, pulse, Grimace, Activity, and Respiration (APGAR) scoring, clinical examination, and pulse oximetry. Only newborns fulfilling the following inclusion and exclusion criteria were recruited.

Inclusion criteria

The inclusion criteria were as follows:

Gestational age between 37 and 42 weeksFetal heart rate of 110–160 beats/minFetal heart variability of between 5 and 25 beats/minAPGAR score of 7–10 at 1 and 5 minBirth weight of 2.50–4.00 kgNormal general and systemic physical examinationSPO2 of 90%–100%Normal echocardiographic findingsParental/caregiver consent.

Exclusion criteria

The exclusion criteria were as follows:

Absent deceleration and abnormal variability on CTG monitorCongenital birth defects on physical examinationPulmonary problemsCardiac lesions detected on echocardiogramParental/caregiver refusal to give consent.

Recruitment continued consecutively until sample size of 120 was reached.

Estimation of sample size

The sample size was calculated using estimates of neonatal left ventricular end-systolic diameter (LVESD) from previous studies and assuming zα= standard normal deviate corresponding to a two-sided level of significance of 5% = 1.96 with level of precisionof 0.25 and standard deviation (SD) of LVESD of 1.25. This resulted in a sample size of 120. Each patient completing the study, however, would have been five times (day of birth, days 7, 14, 21, and 28) thus generating a total of 600 readings for each evaluated parameter in all the babies.

Echocardiographic assessment

Echocardiographic assessment was made with the Sonosite Titan mobile ultrasound machine with 5.0 MHz transducer; measurements were made according to the American Society of Echocardiography recommendations.[3] The imaging planes as identified by the transducer location were as follows: subxiphoid, apical, and right parasternal views for appropriate evaluation of cardiac anatomy.[4] The test was carried out when the newborns were asleep or if awake were calm. An initial echocardiogram was carried out to exclude congenital heart defects before the cardiac dimensions were measured. Pulse oximetry was also carried out using neonatal maximo pulse oximeter before each evaluation. The measurements obtained in millimeters were as follows: main pulmonary artery, right ventricular anterior wall thickness, right ventricular diameter in diastole, interventricular septum thickness in diastole, and interventricular septal thickness in systole. The mean and the SD of each echocardiographic dimension were calculated. The newborns were followed up every week till day 28 of life.

The pictorial locations for the right ventricular echo dimension measurements are shown in [Figure 1].{Figure 1}

Statistical analysis

The correlation between the echocardiographic measurements, weight, and age was carried out using Pearson's correlation coefficient. The study of the echocardiographic variables was complemented with the construction of a nomogram at the 5th and 95th centile using 95 confidence intervals.

All statistical analyses were performed considering a level of significance of 5% (P < 0.05).

 Results



One hundred and twenty normal term newborns were studied of which 60 males and 60 females. The mean weight varied from 3.16 to 4.02 kg, the length varied from 48.25 to 54.38 cm, whereas the body surface area (BSA) varied from 0.036/m2 to 0.037/m2. [Table 1] presents the mean values and their respective SDs relative to age, weight, length, BSA, whereas [Table 2] presents the mean values and their respective SDs relative to the echocardiographic measurements. [Figure 2], [Figure 3], [Figure 4], [Figure 5], [Figure 6] represents the normograms derived from the echocardiographic measurements.{Table 1}{Table 2}{Figure 2}{Figure 3}{Figure 4}{Figure 5}{Figure 6}

 Discussion



RV physiology was identified as a priority in cardiovascular research in 2006 by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute;[2] only a few studies then had addressed the prognostic importance of RV diastolic function. The difficulty in studying RV diastolic function was assumed to be the marked load dependence of RV filling indexes. RV function has been shown to be a major determinant of clinical outcome, and therefore, should be considered during clinical management and treatment.[1]

The right ventricular anterior wall end-diastolic thickness, interventricular septum end-diastolic thickness, and the interventricular septum end-systolic thickness were similar to that derived in previous studies.[5],[6],[7] Right ventricular end-diastolic diameter in this study was similar to that obtained by Güzeltaş and Eroǧlu[8] and Kampmann et al.[5] though the study groups were not exactly the same; it was smaller than that obtained by Hagan et al.[7] and Solinger et al.[6] This could be due to the fact that the former study like ours obtained the echocardiographic measurements according to the American Society of Echocardiography recommendations[3] while the latter two studies did not.

This study demonstrated a weak correlation between the body weight and the pulmonary artery, the right anterior wall thickness and the right ventricular dimension in diastole. Suleymanoglu, on the other hand, demonstrated a statistically significant positive relationship between body weight and height and right ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes.[9]

Kim et al.,[10] in Japan, demonstrated postnatal decreases in PA size as being negatively related to body weight. This study demonstrated a linear increase in the size of the pulmonary artery with a positive moderate correlation.

Studies done in the African population did not review the RV,[11] and hence, the findings in this study could not be compared with any in the study of African babies. Thus, the present study could add to the data bank of normograms for right ventricular dimensions in the newborn.

 Conclusions



This study has focused on right ventricular echocardiographic dimensions in normal newborn using a longitudinal cohort of newborn evaluated using CTG and pulse oximetry monitoring, thus demonstrating true normal zero probability of recruiting asphyxiated babies. The parameters thus can be used for evaluating Nigerian newborns pending the availability of results from larger multicenter studies.

Recommendations

Further studies, particularly larger multicenter studies across multiple different regions are needed with larger sample size to obtain more generalizable newborn nomograms.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

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