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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 16  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 83-91

Obesity, hypertension, and dyslipidemia among human immunodeficiency virus patients in Abeokuta Ogun State, Nigeria


1 Department of Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Faculty of Public Health, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria
2 Department of Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Faculty of Public Health, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan; Department of Medicine, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Ikeola Adeoye
Department of Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Faculty of Public Health, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/njc.njc_10_18

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Context: The coexistence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) with non communicable disease risk factors is an emerging public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa. Aims: We investigated the prevalence and risk factors of obesity, hypertension, and dyslipidemia among HIV-positive patients in Abeokuta. Settings and Design: This was a cross-sectional study done using 206 persons living with HIV in three hospitals at Abeokuta, South Western Nigeria. Subjects and Methods: The WHO stepwise interviewer-administered questionnaire was used for data collection. Specific clinical information on HIV treatment status and traditional cardiovascular risk factors were assessed. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Chi-square, and multivariate logistic regression at P < 0.05. Results: The prevalence of overweight/obesity was 34.0% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 27.5–40.5); 20.9% (95% CI: 15.3–26.4) for hypertension; and 40.2% (95% CI: 33.5–47.0) for dyslipidemia. Risk factors for obesity were sedentary time (odds ratio [OR] 1.2; 95% CI: 1.0–1.3), hypertension (OR 3.0; 95% CI: 1.1–6.0), and increasing duration of HIV (OR for 2–5 years = 2.0; 95% CI: 1.0–4.1 and OR for >5 years = 3.0; 95% CI: 1.0–6.3). Age >40 years (OR 7.9; CI: 2.7–23) and CD4 level ≥ 350/μl (OR 3.9; 95% CI: 1.0–14.6) were risk factors for hypertension while female sex protected against hypertension (OR 0.2; 95% CI: 0.1–0.6). None of the measured covariates predicted dyslipidemia. Conclusion: Obesity, hypertension, and dyslipidemia are common in HIV patients in Nigeria. HIV patients would benefit from cardiovascular diseases screening programs just like the general adult population if the gains of HIV care are not to be reversed.


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