• Users Online: 388
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 62-66

Pediatric heart failure among emergency room admissions in a Tertiary Health Centre in Southern Nigeria


1 Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Niger Delta University, Wilberforce Island, Amassoma; Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Niger Delta University Teaching Hospital, Okolobiri, Bayelsa State, Nigeria
2 Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Niger Delta University Teaching Hospital, Okolobiri, Bayelsa State, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Chika Onyinyechi Duru
Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Niger Delta University, Wilberforce Island, Bayelsa State
Nigeria
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0189-7969.165166

Rights and Permissions

Introduction: Heart failure is a common pediatric emergency. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence and underlying causes of heart failure among children admitted to the Children's Emergency Ward of the Niger Delta University Teaching Hospital Okolobiri, Bayelsa State. Materials and Methods: Over a 1-year period from January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2014; consecutive children presenting to the emergency ward with clinical features of heart failure were recruited. After stabilization and management, a proforma was opened for each patient containing details of the history, physical examination, underlying causes of the heart failure, method of treatment, and outcome. Results: Of the 473 children seen over the study period, 79 of them presented with clinical features of heart failure, accounting for 16.7% of the total pediatric admissions with a male: female ratio of 1.4:1. Their ages ranged from 1½ months to 14 years (mean age 35.3 ± 34.9 months). The major underlying causes of heart failure were anemia (59.5%) and lower respiratory tract infections (21.5%). Severe malaria was the most common cause of anemia. Of the 79 cases, there were 17 deaths (case fatality rate of 21.5%), which accounted for over 50% of the total mortalities in the Children's Emergency room over the study period. Mortality from heart failure was significantly associated with increased severity of heart failure at presentation (P = 0.004; Fishers exact test). Conclusion: Scaling up malaria prevention programs, strengthening immunization practices, prompt recognition and treatment of the underlying causes of heart failure would reduce morbidity and mortality from this easily preventable and treatable condition.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed2380    
    Printed52    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded261    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal